Healing Journeys is based on the belief that the body has great capacity to heal. We practice the very best techniques to engage and assist this capacity. We lend our skills, knowledge, and intention to help patients regain and optimize health, and prevent illness and injuries. Emotional Release Pt 2 | Healing Journeys Blog

Emotional Release Pt 2

Emotional Release - It’s Not What You Think! Part 2

Here’s how it works: When a restriction resists gentle, hands-on techniques, this can be a clue that there is some sort of content holding the restriction in place—and waiting to be addressed. To find out, assuming my patient is willing, I begin by asking their body: “Is the restriction we’re working on primarily physical, emotional, spiritual, or a combo?”

For someone who’s never talked directly to their tissues, this may seem like a leap. And it can take some getting used to. But my approach has several advantages, both immediate and long-term. It saves a great deal of time. It avoids any possibility of me telling people what their stuff is, even if I thought I knew. And it eliminates any risk of the therapist projecting his or her stuff onto the patient, which unfortunately does happen. It more fully involves patients in their own healing. In fact, it puts them where they belong, in the driver’s seat. Finally, after just a little practice, patients are empowered to work on themselves any time, anywhere, should the need or interest arises.

I wouldn’t be asking if I’d managed to release the restriction without my patient’s assistance. So I may have my suspicions, but my agenda is always to do what’s best for my patient, not demonstrate my psychic prowess, or lack thereof. My patient is completely free to report what he or she hears in his or her mind. In fact, if the content is something the patient doesn’t want to share, I’m fine with that, too. But I encourage them to at least hear it. Either way, we proceed according to what they hear and to the extent that their willing to proceed.

I there’s resistance, it’s there for a reason. Assuming the patient is willing, we will try to understand it. We will try to negotiate it. But we will never overpower it. That is absolutely inappropriate. Recently, I was working with a young girl. She had a restriction in her right lung and the beginning of scoliosis in her thoracic spine. She is right at that age when girls are most prone to developing scoliosis. When she explored the restriction, she discovered some content. She wasn’t willing to share it or let it go. All I could do was explain why there might be a better way to deal with things and left it at that. When she came back several weeks later, there’d been a shift in her family dynamics, the restriction had eased significantly, and she was willing to let go of the rest.

Here’s how it works: When a restriction resists gentle, hands-on techniques, this can be a clue that there is some sort of content holding the restriction in place—and waiting to be addressed. To find out, assuming my patient is willing, I begin by asking their body: “Is the restriction we’re working on primarily physical, emotional, spiritual, or a combo?”

For someone who’s never talked directly to their tissues, this may seem like a leap. And it can take some getting used to. But my approach has several advantages, both immediate and long-term. It saves a great deal of time. It avoids any possibility of me telling people what their stuff is, even if I thought I knew. And it eliminates any risk of the therapist projecting his or her stuff onto the patient, which unfortunately does happen. It more fully involves patients in their own healing. In fact, it puts them where they belong, in the driver’s seat. Finally, after just a little practice, patients are empowered to work on themselves any time, anywhere, should the need or interest arises.

I wouldn’t be asking if I’d managed to release the restriction without my patient’s assistance. So I may have my suspicions, but my agenda is always to do what’s best for my patient, not demonstrate my psychic prowess, or lack thereof. My patient is completely free to report what he or she hears in his or her mind. In fact, if the content is something the patient doesn’t want to share, I’m fine with that, too. But I encourage them to at least hear it. Either way, we proceed according to what they hear and to the extent that their willing to proceed.

I there’s resistance, it’s there for a reason. Assuming the patient is willing, we will try to understand it. We will try to negotiate it. But we will never overpower it. That is absolutely inappropriate. Recently, I was working with a young girl. She had a restriction in her right lung and the beginning of scoliosis in her thoracic spine. She is right at that age when girls are most prone to developing scoliosis. When she explored the restriction, she discovered some content. She wasn’t willing to share it or let it go. All I could do was explain why there might be a better way to deal with things and left it at that. When she came back several weeks later, there’d been a shift in her family dynamics, the restriction had eased significantly, and she was willing to let go of the rest.

Emotional Release part three will be published soon - plan to visit in several days